Avastar has progressed to RC12 and I’m in the middle of creating facial expressions to convey the mood of my Bento Avatar.

When upgrading Avastar i somehow ran into an issue that caused my Rig to export animations that flipped the facial bones upside down. I sent a bug report and we spent hours trying to work out why this happen and how to fix it.

I still don’t know how the rig became corrupted but with guidance from the avastar team i was able to create a new rig and re-bind my Mesh Body without having to loose all the weight mapping and settings. This new found ability to rebind mesh to new rigs is great news but does have some important steps needed to prevent screwing things up, such as setting appearance control to ‘no sliders’ before unbinding.

 

Setting the Mood

Reaching the 100th iteration of my mesh body i finally moved onto scripting the menu system built into the avatar. These options will allow the user to Select masking presets or custom masking. There is also an updated wet mode i first introduced in the first loki mesh avatar. But with this being a Bento Avatar i’m also adding some new features.

Moods is a new option with which you can select your avatars mood such as being happy, sad, grumpy or frightened. These aim to animate your avatars face in response to what ever occasion you might find yourself in at a party or during a role-play game.

 

Learning to smile.

It’s a universal world wide view that to draw a smile you simply draw an upward curve, but in reality a smile does not really do that, its a lot more complex and it has taken me a while to learn how best to animate a smile with Bento. Trying to avoid upward curves and ending with a scary grinning face turned out harder than i expected especially when results vary between blender and second life.

I even looked at Medhues examples of using movement/translations to create a more natural smile, but realised that doing such a thing has side effects that would need extensive workarounds to use. Though i did learn how to animate the tongue to stick out.

When it comes to face expressions i’m finding subtlety is best because expressions seem to work best when glanced briefly. The combination of movement between body and face can really bring the avatar to life in a way that has been lacking in Second Life for 14 years.

 

With these Bento Hands

So i think I’m on the final stretch with regards to my personal Bento Avatar. I’m basically scripting the options and testing our various moods to see what works best. I’ve also been experimenting with adding Bento enabled animations to objects that animate you to grip them as well as add little bit of casual flare.

Next week i hope to start on the consumer version which will replace the head with a default avatars head in the hope users can reproduce their classic avatar faces. How well this will work… will have to just wait and see :-p

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